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#16 Elsa Von Spielburg

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Posted 25 September 2013 - 04:50 PM

:lol: Yup, I remember Warcraft 3 has Balistas/Glaives that are also in World of Warcraft and they throw blades :D And I also remember the Balistas in Age of Mythology :D They use big arrows :D



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#17 Rath Darkblade

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Posted 27 September 2013 - 11:06 AM

Okay, maybe this is because I know next to nothing about chainmail armor, but shouldn't she be wearing something to protect her stomach too? That looks rather vulnerable!

 

What's that pad on her leg? And why DO so many characters (video games, comic books, movies enc) wear only one shoulderpad? Granted, I don't see any on Elsa, but I've always wondered about that...

 

Soulforge, you are absolutely right.  In real life, there is no way that ANYONE could just wear only chain-mail.  You see, chain mail is made from a large number of chain rings that are woven or riveted together in order to form a tight "vest" (normally chain mail protects only the torso and upper arms).  However, you must wear some kind of protective clothing or armour underneath - if you didn't, the rings would press against your skin and cause chafing, or even pierce the skin and cause infection.  Mostly, a gambeson or padded defensive jacket was worn beneath chain mail. Gambeson were produced with a sewing technique called quilting, and was usually constructed from linen or wool stuffed with scrap cloth or horse hair.

 

Some chain mail "vests" were made from wrought iron, but later ones were also made from heat-treated steel.

 

As for the ballista - again, Ghost Rider is correct! :)  A ballista is a siege weapon peculiar to the ancient Romans, who used it to launch oversized arrows or even stones.  According to the writings of Flavius Josephus, it was used during the very famous siege of Jerusalem in 69 A.D.  Here is more on the ballista: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ballista ;)


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#18 Paladinlover

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 02:26 PM

 

A modern ballistics helmet is mainly to protect against bullets and other high speed projectiles. I am sure it would protect against rocks too, unless they were 1000 lb / 500 kg rocks. Doesn't matter how much armor you have on if that much weight lands on you. 

 

Well, not just bullets, but also against shrapnel and the shockwaves produced by explosions. They're also used to mount radio equipment for communication and cameras for recording what happened and relaying it to command. Modern warfare is modern.

 

But again, don't be fooled by the whole 'bulletproof' thing. There's really no such thing as 100% bulletproof armor. Modern ballistic helmets have been tested against a variety of weapons. Many were shot by WW2 or even WW1 era guns and for the most part, the bullets went clean through on both ends. It depends on the caliber used, the bullet type, and most importantly, the range. Firing a 9mm FMJ at point blank might breakthrough, but a similar round hitting at 100 meters would have no chance of punching through. Like I said, I tried a Level IIIA vest, that is one of the strongest armors available for non-military use. 

 

But as for 500 lb rocks... you're basically roadkill regardless of what you're wearing. :P

 

 


 

Soulforge, you are absolutely right. In real life, there is no way that ANYONE could just wear only chain-mail. You see, chain mail is made from a large number of chain rings that are woven or riveted together in order to form a tight "vest" (normally chain mail protects only the torso and upper arms). However, you must wear some kind of protective clothing or armour underneath - if you didn't, the rings would press against your skin and cause chafing, or even pierce the skin and cause infection. Mostly, a gambeson or padded defensive jacket was worn beneath chain mail. Gambeson were produced with a sewing technique called quilting, and was usually constructed from linen or wool stuffed with scrap cloth or horse hair.

 

 

This is one thing that most people in Fantasy gaming neglect. Armor is rarely put on 'as is', and this is true for chain mail AND plate armor. Actually this is even more true for plate armor. When knights wore that stuff, they had a full outfit underneath it called an arming doublet that protected them against the metal plates and gave the plates a basis to be put on, and also had parts of flexible chain in areas where the plate armor wasn't covering, like the armpits (they needed those parts exposed to allow articulation and movement, without which, you're basically useless in a combat situation).The armor itself wasn't worn like a suit of clothes either, it had to be strapped, bolted, and even screwed on. In fact, screws were first invented as a way of piecing together the armor. You needed a squire or someone who understood how to put the armor to help you. It wasn't something you could do by yourself.



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